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The V-Spot: My BF Won’t Go Down on Me

Hi Yana,

My boyfriend refuses to go down on me. As a bisexual woman who has been in long term relationships with women, it’s something I miss. I bring it up and he gets defensive about it. I’m always down to give the blow jobs and don’t believe in not doing so just because he doesn’t go down on me.

He’s tight lipped about why he isn’t interested in it. He makes it seem like we would have to be together for a long time before he does, but it has been over six months — and we live together. Any suggestions?

— Left Bi & Dry

Dear Bi & Dry,

Tight lipped, eh? Sounds like he’s not the only one!

Without much background information, I’m left with a few questions that’ll determine my advice:

1.) What has he done to make it seem like he wants you two to have more relationship history before going down on you? Did he say this outright? Or are his answers vague; he mentions “trust” and “knowing each other better,” but does not offer any idea of what that might look like?

2.) How have you brought it up with him? Is it in a way that warrants his defensive reaction? Or are you approaching this from a perspective that truly wants to understand his aversion to going down?

3.) And then finally: Has he NEVER gone down on you ever in your entire relationship? Or is this a new, sudden, or gradual change?

In my experience, both personal and professional, someone’s resistance to performing oral sex (beyond they simply don’t care for it) is usually about:

1.) Gendered, social sex education that expects women to perform oral sex on men. (Need an example? Let’s play a game and count the number of magazine cover stories this month that feature an article about BJs and compare them to the cover stories run about cunnilingus. Meanwhile, men don’t get the social message that “Being a Good Lover = Providing Oral Sex” pounded into their heads, so some may feel less urgency/“off the hook” about it.

2.) Bad sexual experience with performing oral sex…continue reading…

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My Seven Minutes in Heaven With GO Magazine

Welcome to “Seven Minutes in Heaven,” GO Magazine’s brand new interview series that profiles a different queer person each day by asking them seven unique (and sometimes random) questions. Get to know the thoughts, feelings and opinions of the groundbreaking, fierce forces-of-nature in the queer community.

I first found Yana Tallon-Hicks through fellow online sex columnists and writers. I immediately became an avid reader of her work. The way she tackles complex conversations around non-monogamy, questioning sexuality and experimenting with new sexual pleasures was both smart and fun. So often, people are terrified to ask questions about sex or even talk about pleasure with their partners. Yana makes talking about consent and relationships accessible and feel like something we can all integrate into our lives.

As a budding sex educator myself, seeing that other people are also committed to teaching consent and pleasure-based sex education gives me hope. It inspires me that someday maybe we’ll have a society that values consent and empowering our young people with holistic sex education. Yana is out there doing the work and providing people of all experiences with the knowledge to make informed sexual decisions. Today, we spent seven minutes in heaven getting to know Yana and a bit more about her work.

GO Magazine: Who are you and what do you do?

Yana Tallon-Hicks: I’m Yana! I use she/her pronouns and I’m a pleasure-positive, consent-focused sex educator, I’m a sex columnist, and I’m a relationships therapist. I teach workshops about topics such as non-monogamy, sex toys, pleasure, and consent to a variety of audiences included teens, college students, and adults. I also do in-person therapy and online sex and relationship coaching for a wide variety of clients—mostly queer, women, femme, and/or non-monogamous folks.

I also obsess over how much I love my dog, eat a lot of baked goods, and do a lot of yoga.

GO: Where do you go for inspiration when you’re feeling discouraged or depleted?

YTJ: I really appreciate the work of other sex educators, sexuality professionals, and artists. Watching them authentically hustle for the shared things we believe in is incredibly inspiring but also reminds me that I’m not The Only One carrying my hopes and dreams for a more pleasure-empowered world.

This really helps me burst the isolation/savior bubble that can come along with being an independently employed freelancer who essentially relates to people for a living but only from a professional standpoint. That can easily get really tiring if you can’t turn to the other people doing similar work in your community—even if that community is only found online.

GO: Who are your queer role models?

YTH: Making more space for my own personal vulnerability to influence my work is something I’m striving for these days. As an Aquarius with Virgo rising this isn’t the easiest task for me. So, my queer role models tend to be the people I observe doing their creative work in a way that is both authentically vulnerable and powerfully professional. So, Andre ShaktiJiz Lee, Noel’le Longhaul, and Alok Vaid-Menon are all total bosses of their own creative life’s work and I really admire that.

I’m also quite lucky to cohabitate with a queer artist. My husband Patrick MacDonald inspires me to push my own vulnerability in my work every day by giving me permission to do so when I start doubting myself or thinking that I’m “too much.”…read more on GoMag.com

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How Do I Make My Orgasms Come Back?

Dear Yana,

I’m a single woman in my late twenties, with no relationships on the horizon. But that’s OK, because I have a super intense, cordless Hitachi that I’m in love with.

Problem is, recently, whenever I have attempted to reach orgasm, it never comes. I get the brink, right before the fall, but I’m just stuck. This has happened with lovers in the past; one even suggested it was a problem with not being able to “let go.”

Perhaps I am not relaxing enough when I masturbate. What are some tips, tricks, or techniques to have that incredible, solo experience?

— Absent Orgasms

Dear Absent,

I’m laughing a little at your partner’s (I’m sure well-meaning) suggestion to “let go” seeing as that is technically what an orgasm is, after all — a build-up followed by a release. It’s almost like your partner was like “Honey, have you tried just having an orgasm?”

I kid, but really, please let this sex columnist and educator tell you that nobody (not even your partner, not even me) can tell you the key to finding and experiencing your own sexual satisfaction. But, I can give you some suggestions to try out!

From your question, it sounds like you’ve been able to orgasm in the past and it’s only recently that the Os have hit the skids. This can be for a variety of reasons — new medications (especially antidepressants), new stress levels, new major life events, etc. Emily Nagoski’s free desire brakes/gas pedal worksheets (thedirtynormal.com) can help assess environmental, relational, and personal factors that may be impacting your current experiences of desire and pleasure.

In my opinion, with the rumbly, reliable, powerful Hitachi, you’re armed with the perfect tool for the titillating task at hand. But I find myself wondering how many laps you’re taking around the brink before attempting to push yourself over the orgasmic edge. Meaning, do you turn the Hitachi on high, make clitoral contact, and then smash the gas pedal straight to the finish line? Or do you take time with yourself to build up anticipation? Experiment with bringing yourself close to the tipping point of orgasm and then backing off on sensation…continue reading…

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My Doc Won’t Give Me A Vasectomy!

Hi Yana,

What can we do to build our case to hesitant doctors to perform vasectomies on young people (between 18-25 years old)? What would you recommend to someone interested in this procedure?

I have been trying to get my GP (general practitioner) on board since my early 20s and I know so many other young men aiming for the same procedure. When I ask for it, I’m chided for my decision, denied the procedure, or told to redirect my focus elsewhere by health professionals.

When a medical reason is not given, as in my case, it makes me curious how they’re reaching their professional opinion. (I don’t want to doubt my doctors and I will gladly trust someone who spent half her life in school just to help others’ live healthier).

But still, I’m clear that I do not wish to have children: What I am less clear about is why myself and so many other men my age are maligned as they try to schedule what I would say is arguably a standard health procedure.

— Def Don’t Want Kids

Dear Def,

I’ll be the first to say it: I know squat about vasectomies and I’m certainly no doctor, but here’s what I’ve found.

A vasectomy is a brief and relatively basic medical procedure used to sterilize penises by sealing off the vas deferens tubes, which act as the sperm superhighway during ejaculation. Sealed tubes = sperm-less ejaculate = deeply reduced chances of impregnating someone.

An estimated 500,000 Americans receive vasectomies each year. Fewer than 5 percent of people who get vasectomies experience complications. And around 10 percent of vasectomy-havers inquire about reversals post-vasectomy, according to the American Urological Association.

Though reversals are possible, they tend to be more costly, more invasive, and may not bring the person’s fertility back to the place it was pre-procedure, according to the Chicago Tribune article, “Young, Single Men Choosing Vasectomies.” Overall, it seems pretty common and safe.

In 2016, Lauren Oster wrote a piece for Redbook magazine, “The Parenting Choice My Doctors Won’t Let Me Make,” about her yet-to-be-fulfilled mission to get an elective medical sterilization procedure done — over the last 15 years. She is a childless-by-choice, 36-year-old woman who has had similar experiences you are reporting such as being redirected, shamed, questioned, and each time, rejected…continue reading…

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Am I Mono or Poly?

Hi Yana,

I always thought of myself as a monogamous person who sometimes dabbled with non-monogamy, but lately I’ve really been struggling to determine just what my “relationship paradigm” is. It started when I was in a non-mono relationship that transitioned to a mono one. We tried to get our conflicting needs met, but ultimately we made the painful decision to part ways.

I then started some casual relationships and developed real feelings for two people — which I didn’t think was possible for me. This was so surprising that I stopped dating to process this new self-discovery.

I’m struggling to figure out what relationship type I should be doing. Online forums and books make it sound like everyone has this stuff figured out, to the point that I wonder what I’m missing that makes it so difficult for me to determine my own relational nature.

I’ve consulted the usual sources of information available: I’ve spoken to friends that identify as non-monogamous, and since relocating last year I’ve been going to a non-mono meet-up group. My friends all seem to have just instinctively known they were not mono. The meet-up experience has been somewhat mixed — I’ve met some really helpful people, but I’ve also run into blatant distrust from those who think that, as a heterosexual cis-gendered male who is currently going it solo, I must be there for less-than-honest reasons. I need to figure this out before I start dating again. Someone suggested I might be a “switch,” able to be happy in either a mono- or poly-type relationship with the right partner(s). To me, this sounds about as realistic as a unicorn, but is it possible? Am I missing or not seeing something?

— The Mono-Poly Guy

Dear Mono-Poly Guy,

Who am I? What does this mean? What the fuck was that? These are the big ol’ life questions that come up for all of us when it comes to sex, love, and relationships — monogamous or not. Your epic confusion is entirely normal. And so is your desire to sort it all out.

When it comes to non-monogamy, and to polyamory specifically, folks tend towards one of two categories: they either see “polyamorous” as a personal identity that describes them in much the same way as being male, or bisexual, or Christian might. Or, they identify non-monogamy as a relationship style — it’s something that they do, but isn’t necessarily who they are…continue reading…

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How Do I End a Perfectly Fine Relationship?

Hi Yana,

How does one respectfully remove themselves from a relationship that in fact does not have any huge problems?

I’m with a righteous man who checks a lot of boxes but doesn’t get me excited. I enjoy his company, we have a great time and do a lot of cultural things. The flip side is there is no passion, there is no tingle. As someone that is used to the old fade out move, how do I end a relationship respectfully and with integrity? And where are my balls to do this?

— Fan of the Fade

Dear Fade,

One of my favorite “celebrity” relationship therapists is Esther Perel. She’s famous for her work with couples and infidelity (check out her awesome TEDTalk “Rethinking Infidelity”) meaning, she knows a thing or two about the hard work of relationship repair and its tragic opposite: the break-up.

In a recent article titled Relationship Accountability, she details four break-up styles: ghosting, icing, simmering, and power parting, which are on a scale in order of least direct/brave to most direct/brave.

Ghosting, as we know, is a vague-yet-transparent drop-off-the-face technique, while power parting grabs your break-up by those balls you mention and says straight up, “This relationship has been great for XYZ reasons, but now it’s time to end it.”

The other two (icing and simmering) exist luke-warmly in the middle. Sounds to me like you’re somewhere in the simmering department: reducing the frequency of dates and communication while you silently plot your exit, assuming your BF is none-the-wiser — though, he likely is, but just doesn’t have the concrete proof he needs to call it out.

The most interesting part of Perel’s commentary about the four break-up styles is her reflections on what our break-up style says about us. While power parting is often easily done by the self-assured, the other three tend to highlight within us some shadow sides of our sense of self: we’re terrified to hurt our partner so we stay; we’re anxious that we can’t handle being lonely or sad, even just for a little while, so we stay; we like the security of sure companionship, but want to be able to browse other options whilst buffered by a safety net.

The reality of a break-up is that no one will come out of it unscathed…continue reading…